Question: Should Downloading Music Be Illegal?

Specifically, the study found that legal purchases would be about 2 percent lower without illegal downloading available—meaning, yes, illegal downloads boost legal downloads.

Their conclusion: people who download pirated music mostly do so for tunes they wouldn’t have ever spent money on.

Is downloading free music illegal?

Yes, and no. According to copyright law, distribuiting or obtaining a copyrighted work (such as a music file) without the permission of the copy right holder is against the law. This is why the answer was both yes and no. So, according to copyright law, here is the breakdown for what is illegal and legal.

Should people go to jail for downloading music without paying for it?

But that does not mean personal use downloading is legal. Taking a song or film without paying for it is a breach of copyright. In some US states the online infringement of copyrighted music can be punished by up to three years’ jail and £150,000 in fines. Repeat offenders can be imprisoned for up to six years.

Can you go to jail for illegally downloading music?

Those found guilty of copyright infringement may face the following penalties: Up to five years in jail. Fines and charges of up to $150,000 per file. In addition to any other charges that might be brought against you, the copyright holder can file suit, which can result in legal fees and damages that must be paid.

How much money do musicians lose from illegal downloading?

One credible analysis by the Institute for Policy Innovation concludes that global music piracy causes $12.5 billion of economic losses every year, 71,060 U.S. jobs lost, a loss of $2.7 billion in workers’ earnings, and a loss of $422 million in tax revenues, $291 million in personal income tax and $131 million in lost